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on February 5, 2008 at 2:19:15 pm
 

A FOLLOWERSHIP COMMUNITY OF LEARNING

 

FORUM FOR ALL: Open to all readers

with posting privileges to those who subscribe for free.

 

 

 

JUST PUBLISHED...
TWO NEW BOOKS
Riggio, Ronald E. (Editor), Ira Chaleff (Editor), Jean Lipman-Blumen (Editor), The Art of Followership: How Great Followers Create Great Leaders and Organizations. Jossey-Bass, 2008
The Art of Followership puts dynamic leader-follower interaction at the forefront of discussion. It examines the multiple roles followers play and their often complex relationship to leaders. With contributions from leading scholars and practitioners from the burgeoning field of leadership/followership studies, this groundbreaking book outlines how followers contribute to effective leadership and to organizations overall.

Drawing from various disciplines from philosophy, to psychology and management, to education the book defines followership and its myriad meanings. The Art of Followership explores the practice and research that promote positive followership and reveals the part that followers play in setting the standards and formulating the culture and policies of the group.

 

The contributors include new models of followership and explore fresh perspectives on the contributions that followers make to groups, organizations, societies, and leaders. The book also explores the most current research on followership and includes insights and perspectives on the future of leader-follower relationships.

 

 

Kellerman, Barabara Followership: How Followers Are Creating Change and Changing Leaders. Harvard Business Press, 2008
This groundbreaking volume provides the first sweeping view of followers in relation to their leaders, deliberately departing from the leader-centric approach that dominates our thinking about leadership and management. Barbara Kellerman argues that, over time, followers have played increasingly vital roles. For two key reasons, this trend is now accelerating. Followers are becoming more important, and leaders less. Through gripping stories about a range of people and places--from multinational corporations such as Merck, to Nazi Germany, to the American military after 9/11--Kellerman makes key distinctions among five different types of followers: Isolates, Bystanders, Participants, Activists, and Diehards. And she explains how they relate not only to their leaders but also to each other. Thanks to "Followership," we can finally appreciate the ways in which those with relatively fewer sources of power, authority, and influence are consequential. Moreover, they are getting bolder and more strategic. As Kellerman makes crystal clear, to fixate on leaders at the expense of followers is to do so at our peril. The latter are every bit as important as the former, which makes this book required reading for superiors and subordinates alike.

 

ARTICLES
Anders, George , "Management Leaders Turn Attention to Followers: Firms Should Rely More On Passionate Staffers, Some Experts Believe." Theory and Practice, Wall Street Journal, December 24, 2007; Page B3

 

"Experts in leadership are plentiful, and Barbara Kellerman, a lecturer at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government, counts herself as one of them. Now, though, Ms. Kellerman and some other management experts are turning their attention to the other extreme of the organization chart: what matters to followers.

 

 

 

In "Followership," a book being published this winter, Ms. Kellerman argues that a big organization's fate can be surprisingly dependent on how well it understands thousands of low-ranking employees, and makes them more effective. Entrepreneurs Ori Brafman and Rod Beckstrom took a similar perspective last year in their book, "The Starfish and the Spider," suggesting that lower-ranking employees, called catalysts, need to drive organizational change, instead of top bosses."

http://online.wsj.com/public/article_print/SB119844629771347563.html
There is a WSJ forum related to this article that discusses the question, "Who's more crucial to a company's success, top management or lower-level employees?

 

 

 

 

 

OTHER NEWS 

Items of general interest to those interested in followership issues

 

 

 

 

 

INTRODUCTORY THOUGHTS BY IRA CHALEFF

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Watch other videos on our PBwiki Videos page.

 

Bonus materials!

 

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